Is Twitter killing blogs?

I used to blog quite frequently but lately my blogging has tailed off while my tweeting has risen. This got me thinking about the impact of Twitter on blogs. Objectively Twitter is a great way to promote a blog. It’s also a great way to get across the key points that may otherwise have been in a blog in less than a 140 characters. This has two types of impact:

1. People seem to be abandoning their blogs in favor of tweeting or posting a comment of Facebook.

2. People are using Twitter to get their news and perspective rather than blogs. Twitter gives you a readers digest version of the blog. It cuts to the chase marvelously and makes savage editors out of all of its contributors. In other words people are often simply reading lots of small prices of insight instead of a few longer blog posts.

I’ve heard some people describe Twitter as a micro blogging site. If you agree with that I guess blogging is being replaced by micro blogging.

I have yet to find hard stats on how Twitter has affected the number of blogs out there. I suspect commercial blogs are still on the rise. Whereas personal blogs are disappearing as their writers become tweeters and their readers become Twitter followers. If anyone has robust data on this I’d love to see it. Until then, I’ll just Tweet this blog post.


Is the PR pitch process back to front?

PR agencies know the ropes.  You get invited to pitch for a certain account against other firms.  You then throw a ton of time and effort into it.  At some point it becomes clear that you’ve been chosen by the internal team and then you are passed over to procurement to ‘dot the Is and cross the Ts.’  In most cases that process is also quite familiar.  Procurement comes with a huge list of things they want agencies to give up (most of them involve some form of discount).  Now most procurement departments are quite reasonable while some push things to the limit.  I don’t really blame them, after all it’s their job.  But what this can result in is a situation where you simply can’t accept the terms the procurement people are seeking and you have to walk away.  This is frustrating for everyone concerned.  Should we therefore consider negotiating the contract and financial terms before pitching?  I appreciate that may mean more work for procurement as they may have to try and negotiate with all the potential vendors.  However, they could also simply say these are our terms and if you accept them you can pitch.  If you don’t then you should withdraw now.  Such an approach would save everyone a LOT of time and money and would result in clients only getting pitches from people willing to accept their terms.  As I say, I have nothing against procurement departments being aggressive.  Again, it’s their job to get the best deal for their business.  What is frustrating for the agency is this notion that if you win the pitch that you should then be prepared to sign up to terms that don’t work for your business.  To be clear, this post doesn’t relate to a certain pitch we’ve been involved in.  In truth it related to several that have taken place in the last few months.  Just want to propose a better way for client and the agency to get engaged.


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